Mobile Learning: What I’ve Learned

Mobile Learning: What I’ve Learned

Back in January (lowers head in shame) I started a series about mobile learning. I wanted to know more about it. Well, here we are… finally. After quite a bit of research and my own learning over the last few months here are some things I think could be helpful. What is mobile learning? Mobile learning or mLearning is a vast topic. There are a lot of different ways to interpret it but I’ve chosen to start with its simplest form. Mobile learning is any type of content a learner can or might access while on the go. It doesn’t have to be formal learning but it can be. What does that look like? Videos Does anyone need to know how to take apart their dishwasher to find the filter? Last month I did. I pulled out my phone and brought up YouTube. A simple search for my dishwasher model and I found exactly what I needed. Mobile learning – on demand! Articles Have you ever accessed Wikipedia or a news site from your phone or tablet? Have you ever looked something up while on the go? I’m sure you have. Most of us do. I Google constantly. It’s a verb now! It’s not just the name of a major tech company. Not to mention how often I see the new slang LMGTFYLet Me Google That For You in Facebook groups and comment threads. Photos and infographics There are thousands of photos and job aids available for all kinds of information. Need to learn the periodic table? There’s an infographic for that from the Royal Society of Chemistry. What...
Mobile Learning: what’s it all about?

Mobile Learning: what’s it all about?

I’m tackling at least one new learning trend, tool or idea each month this year. It’s all part of my efforts to grow my own skills and bring more to our clients. Mostly though, I need to start being a “lifelong learner” again – something I haven’t been very good at in the past year. This month, I want to learn more about mobile learning. We all know mobile learning or mLearning about learning on mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. I know that my favourite authoring tool (Articulate Storyline) publishes to mobile-friendly formats like HTML5 but what’s really involved in developing successfully for a mobile learner? So, this month, I’m going to dive a little bit and answer a few questions for myself and hopefully for you too. Sure, I’m not the first one to discover this… it’s been a trend for a while. I’m allowed to catch up, right? My questions Here’s a few questions I want to answer: What exactly is mobile learning? I’m going to explore more examples and see how “traditional” learning is converting to mobile. Why are learners looking for mobile solutions? Do they need on-demand learning or is it just convenience of having their phone wherever they are? What should we do differently if we know some of our audience is mobile? How do we design (and develop) for both mobile and non-mobile learners? When and how do we consider learners using multiple devices? How am I going to answer them? Google is my friend but I also have bookmarks from TD.org and Allen Interactions to take a look at. Of course, I’m also going...
Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year from Hemeon Learning! Wow, it’s been quite the year. I’ve been extremely terrible about keeping the website up to date and even worse with blogging. I can’t promise I’ll do better but I’m starting here and hope to keep it up a little more regularly. My goal – one new blog post a month this year. So what’s happened in the last year or so at Hemeon Learning? It’s been a huge year! At the end of 2015 I decided to leave my full time position of five years to focus more on family and Hemeon Learning. We brought on a couple of additional clients and I was working part-time on a number of projects at any given time as well as playing with/caring for our one year old (two now). Fast forward to June 2016. We made a huge family decision to move from Vancouver, BC, Canada back to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada where both my husband (and Hemeon Learning partner in crime) and I are from. After 13 years in the big city it was time to come back home. What a whirlwind. At the same time, Ivan (hubby) also decided to leave his full time position in favour of helping me at home so I could continue to grow our business. We signed several new clients over the summer and continued working with previous ones. At the end of August we made the big move from coast to coast and settled into our new home (and home office!). We’ve had fun exploring our new neighbourhood and working with new clients as well. Now that winter’s...

Articulate Storyline – Format Painter

Format painter seems to get forgotten in the long list of so many excellent Articulate Storyline features. I know several of the Articulate folks have mentioned it and Jeanette Brooks even did a great tutorial about having multiple hotspots in a quiz question where she mentions format painter. As someone considered an Articulate Storyline consultant in Canada, I use this tool so often that I felt it was worthy of its very own blog post. What is it? Format painter allows you to copy the formatting from one object (any object in Storyline – text box, shape, buttons, etc.) to another object. What’s so great about that? Sure, just copying formatting isn’t enough to knock your socks off. In addition to copying the styles (font, colours, lines, shadows, etc.) it also copies the states from one object to another. This is where format painter becomes my favourite tool. Example please? Imagine that you’re building a slide with several images. When the learner hovers over each image it will highlight the image by changing the colour, adding an outline, and even a text description underneath. This is a “hover” state. You also have a state for when the learner has visited that image (clicked on it). That’s a lot of states to create on each image on a single slide. Without format painter you’d have to add each of the states to each individual image and also add all of the styles to those states, plus the text boxes, etc. Cue format painter. Format your first image, add all the states and format those including adding any text boxes (like...
Dress Code – An Instructional Design Case Study

Dress Code – An Instructional Design Case Study

For quite a while I couldn’t really talk about any of the many eLearning and other instructional design projects I was working on because they were covered by either a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) or other restrictions. I really wanted to start building my portfolio so I embarked on journey to create a fictitious company with a fictitious performance problem. The company’s name is Gas Eight. You can read the company profile I created here. In short, the fictitious company was having challenges with employees not following the dress code. The end result was that employees needed a refresher on the dress code and managers needed new ways to discuss infractions with their employees. In another post I’ll go into more about some of the reasons why I chose the performance improvement plan that I did. For now, I’d like to let you see the demonstration of the simple, scenario-based course I designed to relaunch the dress code to Gas Eight’s employees. The course isn’t complete in the demo but I’m sure you’ll get the idea. Why did I choose scenarios? In this case, scenarios would allow employees to explore various situations that were common dress code violations at Gas Eight. By presenting employees with choices and then asking employees to back up those choices with further choices, it allowed employees to demonstrate and practice. Why not just make them sign off on the policy and review key points? Wouldn’t that be faster? In cases like these, employees often have been asked previously to read the policy (doesn’t just apply to dress code; this can apply to any policy) but...